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William Tuohy


William Tuohy was a war correspondent who was awarded a Pulitzer Prize. During 29 years with The Los Angeles Times, he covered wars and conflicts in Southeast Asia, the Middle East, Northern Ireland, Iran a nd the Falkland Islands. He served as The LA Times bureau chief in Saigon, Beirut, Rome, Bonn and London. Bob Gibson, an OPC member, was LA Times foreign editor in 1966 when he hired Tuohy, then Saigon bureau chief for Newsweek. Gibson, who covered the Korean War for United Press, described Tuohy: "He was a great reporter, a wonderful writer, and he was steady on the ground. You could trust his judgment. He covered everything. He was a 360-degree reporter." For his coverage of the Vietnam War, Tuohy won a 1969 Pulitzer Prize. The Pulitzer judges noted that "few correspondents have seen and written more about the war in Vietnam than William Tuohy." In 1970 while he was bureau chief in Beirut, he won an OPC award for best reporting of foreign affairs. Tuohy appreciated style and fashion. When he was Rome bureau chief, he and another journalist commissioned Gucci to make cases for their lightweight typewriters. Tuohy was born in Chicago on Oct. 1, 1926, and served in the Navy in the Pacific from 1945 to '46.After graduating with honors from Northwestern University in 1951, he began his career in journalism, working first as a copy boy and then reporter and night city editor at the San Francisco Chronicle from 1952 to 1959. He then joined Newsweek in New York as a writer, editor and national political correspondent.He covered the 1964 presidential campaign before volunteering to become Newsweek's Saigon bureau chief in late 1964. His Newsweek bureau won the National Headliners Award in 1965. Tuohy wrote three books: "Dangerous Company" (1987), a memoir of his days as a war correspondent; "The Bravest Man: The Story of Richard O'Kane and U.S. Submariners in the Pacific War" (2001); and "America's Fighting Admirals: Winning the War at Sea in World War II" (2007).